Sammy Davis Jr. and Altovise Davis


Sammy Davis Jr. and Altovise Davis

Sammy Davis Jr. and Altovise Davis are among the unsung heroes of Hollywood. These two are the sons of legendary entertainers and Motown producers. Their fathers helped create the hit records by the Jackson 5 and Diana Ross. Their legacy continues as they are preserving their fathers’ work. In their own way, they are legends in their own right. Here are some facts about them. And remember: They are all great performers!

Unsung Hollywood:

The true story of Manny Davis, an unlikely star who nearly killed himself in a car accident, is the subject of the new Netflix documentary “Manny Davis: Unsung Hollywood”. In a new film, Haygood aims to tell the story of Davis’ life from his perspective as an artist and writer. Davis was a child vaudevillian who rose to fame on Broadway and Las Vegas. He was one of the few black members of the “Rat Pack” and was a star of many films.

Sammy Davis Jr.:

American actor, dancer, and singer Sammy Davis Jr. was a flamboyant icon in the 1970s and early 1980s. In addition to acting, Sammy was a film producer and director, and he also performed stand-up comedy. His legacy lives on today, as many people recognize his name and work. He will be remembered for his many memorable performances, including his roles in the movie, “Say Anything”, and “Saturday Night Fever.”

A talented performer, Sammy Davis Jr. began his career in vaudeville at age three. He went on to perform with the vaudeville group Holiday in Dixieland, helmed by Will Mastin. He was initially billed as “Silent Sam, the Dancing Midget,” but later changed his name to Will Mastin’s Gang Featuring Little Sammy. In 1944, he made his film debut in Rufus Jones for President, which led to a career spanning five decades. After performing in the vaudeville world, Davis went on to perform on the Las Vegas strip.

Altovise Davis:

During his early years, Sammy moved to Brooklyn, New York where he attended the High School of Performing Arts. The couple married on May 11, 1970. He became a Broadway dancer and performed in several musicals. In 1989, he adopted a son, Manny, and later went on to become a member of the Actors Studio. During his lifetime, he performed in over a dozen Broadway productions.

During the late ’70s, he became more limited in his musical output, and his career began to fade away. His career as an actor did not fare much better, though he starred in two films, ‘Gone with the West’ (1975) and ‘Sammy Stops the World’ (1978). In the 1980s, he began to focus more on acting.



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